The Bavarian Purity Law and UNESCO

german-beerGermany has always been a nation that is proud of its brewing heritage. So much so that the country’s brewing association recently began pressuring the United Nations to recognize that fact. In essence, the brewers association wants the Bavarian Purity Law (or Reinheitsgebot) – established some five centuries ago in 1516 – to become part of the UNESCO World Heritage list. In this respect, it would join the Argentinian tango, Iranian carpet weaving and French gastronomy, among other famous traditions, that are considered unique and worth protecting.

Written by Bavarian noblemen in the year 1516, the law states that only water, barley and hops may be used to brew beer (contrary to popular belief, yeast was added to the list centuries later when scientists discovered the fermenting agent). The law was aimed at preventing crops used to make bread from being squandered on brewing. In addition, it wrote the centuries-long practice of using hops to flavor and preserve beer into law – a practice which also ended the use of other psychoactive and potentially poisonous additives during the Middle Ages. But over time, it became synonymous with high-quality German beer and began to be adopted by brewers all over the world.

Muenchner_ReinheitsgebotCurrently, some 5,000 different beers carry its seal. Many brewers today still make beer that would pass muster under the law, though penalties for breaking it are long gone. Modern German brewers are also trying to be more creative with their beers while adhering to the purity law — for example, by adding hops that taste like grapefruit or pineapple. And for many Germans, especially those who endured the many decades of partition during the Cold War, the tradition is something they are especially proud of and want to see recognized internationally.

Marc-Oliver Huhnholz, the spokesman for the German Brewer’s Association, expressed these sentiments and the associations stances thusly:

It stands for the things you are thinking of when you think of Germany and beer and culture and friendship and all these positive things. I think it’s a traditional thing because it brings us together and holds us together as a nation within this more and more international lifestyles… The idea and message is that German beer is pure and will be pure in the future.

However, some German brewers dismiss the attempt to gain UNESCO recognition as mere arrogance. They say the purity law is from a bygone era and that Germany can compete in the world beer market without it.

reinheitsgebot2Opponents of the law claim that limiting his brewing to the centuries-old document restricts creativity. What’s more, they point to the fact that many nations produce high-quality beer that does not adhere to it. For example, Belgium produces such styles as Wits, Saisons, Framboises, Krieks, and Farmhouse Ales that make use of coriander spice, fruit, and other additives that are not permitted by the law. But these styles are internationally renowned and are considered historic examples of fine brewing. In this respect, opinion is roughly divided along lines of culture and historical preservation, and modernization and globalization.

Personally, and as someone who’s wife works in Heritage, I can certainly sympathize with those who wish to see this law protected. All too often, the process of modernization and change has the effect of eroding our cultural foundations. At the same time, I can sympathize with modern German brewers who would like to expand and adopt new ways of making beers. And since penalties associated with it have not been enforced for some time, there really is no reason to fear it remaining in effect.

And if the modern brewing industry has taught us anything, there’s much to be gained by marrying tradition to innovation. For those who want to get truly experimental, there’s plenty of opportunity to be had. And for those who want to keep making beer according to centuries-old traditions, I’m sure their will always be a market. And let’s not forget that we can do both. If the craft brewing revolution has taught us anything, it’s that we can experiment and innovate and keep traditions alive all at the same time.

And In the meantime, drink up, and have a happy holiday season!

Source: npr.org

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Lighthouse 15th Anniversary Ale

Lighthouse_15thanniversaryAs promised, I’m back with one of Victoria’s most important and summer limited releases. It seems that this year marks the Lighthouse Brewing Company’s 15th anniversary. And to celebrate, they have produced an anniversary ale which was clearly made with the brewery’s history in mind. I say this because over the years, the brewery has shown quite the range when it comes to producing different styles of beer. This has included the standard lineup, consisting of your typical British and American-style ales, but has also extended to include continental and time-honored varieties that are sightly more esoteric.

And it seems that all of these have gone into the creation of this ale, which interestingly enough, names no specific variety on the label. And you’ll understand why as soon as you taste it. It’s dark and possesses some of the toasted, subtle tones of a brown, but is packed with some discernable sugars and is potently strong. And then there’s the hops and yeast, distinctly British in origin, and the Maibock like tang and sweetness that lingering on the palate. It is a brown? It is a barely wine? Is it a bock? Is it a bitter? Well… yes, and no, and all the above.

Appearance: Dark brown, transparent, good foam retention and carbonation
Nose: Dry English hops, light, nutty brown malts, sugars
Taste: Immediate burst of roasted malts, tang, notes of brown sugar and dry, bitter hops
Aftertaste: Lingering sweetness and tang, similar to Maibock, and dry hop bitterness
Overall: 8.5/10

Not a bad way to mark 15 years of brewing: produce a beer that cuts across styles and traditions and offers some very varied taste. And of course, Lighthouse is no stranger to this trend, as exemplified by their Big Flavor series. Here, they would combine two distinct styles to produce some rather powerful and flavorful beers. This time around, they appear to have combined about four that I can discern, and with some rather flavorful results. Get some before its gone!

Oh, and Happy Birthday Lighthouse!

Home Made Jerk Seasoning!

jerk_seasoning_16x9At last, I’ve come to embrace the challenge, to make my own homemade jerk seasoning and let the results speak for themselves. As anyone familiar with my site here knows, at times I like to talk about food. I’m pretty DIY when it comes to good recipes, and enjoy making certain foods that promote comfort, are healthy, and go well with beer. And as I’ve come to compile a pretty a long list of spice-compatible beers over the years, I thought it was about time I tried to make my favorite spicy sauce!

For anyone who’s tried making the sauce, jerk seasoning/sauce/spice presents a bit of a challenge. It consists of several ingredients, the exact combination of which are subject to interpretation since it, like the region which spawned it (the Caribbean) is a very diverse place. Nevertheless, the basic premise remains pretty consistent from place to place and household to household. What all agree upon is the fact that anything bearing the name “jerk” is hot, peppery, and multilayered.

jerk_dinnerThe basic rub/spice comes down to scotch bonnet peppers (aka. habanero) and peppercorns, and the calls for the addition of spices which revolves around the holy trinity of allspice (cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves). You’ve also got your share of onions, garlic, and ginger which, in the case of a rub, would be powdered but need to be fresh if you’re making a sauce or marinade. This not only adds more layers of flavor, but a degree of consistency to it all. The final ingredients which finish the transformation of the spice into a sauce are rum (another Caribbean product of extreme and historical importance) and vinegar.

In my case, I used pale ale and balsamic vinegar, since rum and malt were not available. This did not heavily alter the taste from what I was anticipating, but for purists, I’m thinking only rum and malt vinegar will do here. And of course, only true habaneros should suffice for spice. No chillies, no jalapenos, no substitutes of any kind. Half of making jerk seasoning is measuring out the heat, and with habanero/scotch bonnets, a little goes a LONG way!

The following list was used by me, and the proportions were not exact, hence why I don’t list specific quantities. Best to just experiment until you get the color, consistency, and taste you want. So using the following template, combine the following ingredients in a bowl and grind well.

Ingredients:
bay leaves
black pepper
cinnamon
cloves
garlic
ginger

malt vinegar
nutmeg

onion
rum
sea salt
habanero/scotch bonnet peppers (any more than two and your an adventurous SOB!)

Once finely ground, the resulting sauce should be a deep brown color, speckled from the ground pepper, and should smell strong and acidic. The taste should be spicy (obviously), and boast a fair degree of pepper, onion, garlic and be just slightly sweet, and the allspice should also be noticeable. If not, try tweaking the ingredients. Whatever is overpowering it, balance it out with more of the rest.

When finished, use as a rub, marinade, or cooking sauce, slather conservatively on your food, and let it bring out the taste! Remember, moderation is key here. Proper jerk is HOT, so not much should be needed to really made your food sing!

voltage-stout-sliderAnd of course, beer pairing is essential when dealing with this food. And in this case, keeping things geographically and culturally appropriate, I would recommend either a nice, clean lager or a smooth stout, preferably a St. Amboise Oatmeal, a Hoyne’s Voltage Espresso Stout, or a Brooklyn’s Black or Rogue Chocolate Stout. Nothing too overpowering, as you want smoothness to go with your spice.

This weekend, I will be making a third go at producing this sauce and using it as a marinade for a large roast. Paired with a dark beer and some roasted veggies, I know that dinner will be most enjoyable! I recommend you try this recipe out for yourselves since its an inexpensive way to turn your food into a real experience. Until next time, good luck and good eating!

Lost Coast Winterbraun

LostCoastBrew_Color_LogoIn the course of my beer sampling, I rarely get farther south than the great state of Oregon. However, once in awhile I am afforded the opportunity to sample from as far south as California, the Golden Coast and beyond. And I am rarely disappointed or left feeling less rich for the experience.

Tonight was one such time. In my neck of the woods, the Lost Coast lineup has been making the rounds and I find myself wanting to include them in my repertoire. And since I’ve been determined to sample as many winter beers, this one seemed perfectly appropriate. And it was certainly no slouch when it came to delivering in both the flavor or balance of flavors department. Combining a brown ale with the stronger character of a winter beer (8% alc/vol) and roast chocolate, Lost Coast created something that warmed my ribs and tickled my fancy!

Appearance: Deep brown amber, transparent and good foam retentionNose: Strong notes of sugary malts, molasses and brown sugar
Taste: Sweet malts, giving way to crisp dose of hops, roasted nuts and dark cocoa
Aftertaste: Slight coarseness and lingering bitter finish
Overall: 8.5/10

winterbraunOne of the nicest things about this winter beer was the fact that the chocolate comes through in a subtler tones, rather than being heavily overt. What’s more, the dark brown profile and rich, sugary flavor are very appealing and combine with with the beer’s decidedly strong alcohol content. I’ve already earmarked some of their regular fruit-infused beers for consumption, and will be back with some of those just as soon as the right kind of weather rolls around. Somehow, it’s just got to be warm and sunny in order for fruit beer to be appropriate… Wait for it!

Hoyne’s Fall Releases

Earlier today, I stopped in at Hoyne Brewing to get my growlers filled. For my wife and I, this has become a bit of a ritual, as getting two growlers directly from the brewer has proven cheaper and less clunky than buying bottles. It’s also more convenient for us to do this as we only need to go in once a week, rather than having to drive to the liquor store every few days.

And this time around, I finally got to meet the man himself, Mr. Sean Hoyne. And what would you know, he remembered me! After asking where his beer could be found on tap in the downtown region, I brought up the conversation I had with Mrs. Hoyne the last time I was in. She said that they were discontinuing the Big Bock for summer, and that for the fall, they’d be releasing a stout. As the brewmaster, I asked him for confirmation.

“We will have two new beers for the Fall,” he said, much to my delight. “One will be an espresso stout. The other one we’re keeping a surprise.”

Damn, I thought, both intrigued and exasperated. Another big release I have to wait until Fall to experience! Luckily, that gives me and other fans of the Hoyne brewery plenty of time to contemplate what the other Fall release could be. And my wife, always the purveyor of good ideas, suggested I take this opportunity to conduct a poll on what beer drinkers think Mr. Hoyne might have in mind. Here are some possibilities that I myself have been contemplating…

A Pumpkin Ale: Always an appropriate release for the Fall, coinciding with the pumpkin harvests, the arrival of Thanksgiving, and plenty of pumpkin pie! A nice light beer, combining rich malts, a mild hop bite, and the unmistakable notes of pumpkin and nutmeg, this beer is well paired with cold weather and all kinds of fresh and rich Fall foods.

A Maple Ale: Another seasonal feature specific to Fall is the arrival of fresh maple syrup. And here in Canada, where the maple leaf is our national symbol, we do maple syrup right! So it’s natural that craft brewers all over the country and parts of the US choose to inaugurate the season with a beer that combines smooth malts and a slight sweet hint of maple syrup.

An Oktoberfest Lager: Germany is renowned for producing fine beer, especially the historic province of Bavaria, birthplace of Oktoberfest. And in honor of this celebration that marks the Fall harvest, brewers turn out mass quantities of Marzen, Dunkel, and other lagers that are darker in color and sweeter on the palate. What do you think, Hoyne Oktoberfest Marzbier? Has a nice ring to it!

A Brown Ale: Fall is typically the season for making beers that are heavier, darker, and more flavorful than their summer counterparts. When the weather is hot, people prefer a their beer lighter, crisper and more refreshing, and best served cold. But when the weather starts to dip, people like something that will warm their innards and stick to their ribs a little. A malty, rich, dark ale is just the thing to pull this off, something with a roasted malt flavor  that reminds people of fresh roasted chestnuts.

A Fall Porter: And speaking of beers that stick to your ribs, the last entry is the venerable Porter. This style of beer is renowned for its rich flavor, dark toasted malts, and complex taste, which are sure to get your motor running when the weather’s cold. In fact, the beer was made with London “porters” in mind, young men who were on their feet all day and needed a drink to keep them fortified and on the go. Though from the same family as the stout, it is typically lighter and boasting a different palate, containing flavors of licorice and molasses rather than coffee and chocolate.

And that’s all the possibilities that I can think of. Granted, there are many more varieties and variations that Mr. Sean Hoyne could choose to go with, but I do hope this list makes its way to him just in case he’s still pondering what the other Fall release will be! And now it’s time to vote, beer fans. Which beer do you think will be accompanying the Espresso Stout this fall?

Honey Hefe

Just yesterday I was raving about the proliferation of wheat beers that are just in time for the summer. And then what happens? My favorite brewery puts out a seasonal wheat and we show up at the brewery just in time for its release. It’s true. Months back, I was able to speak to the good people at Hoyne about their products and was invited to come by and get some growlers. When my wife and I finally got around to popping in (today), we were told that a new beer was being released and it just happened to be on tap. Sampling ensued…

The friendly staff were on hand to guide us about. And of course, a few samples loosened my tongue and I began yammering to our lovely host about their beers and all the nice things I had to say about them. And wouldn’t you know it, the man himself was there to say hello! I wish I could have chatted with him some more but unfortunately he was busy with a number of things so I didn’t try to keep him. Just as well, I probably would’ve fawned and yammered some more. In any case, we also filled some growlers and brought them home. Drinking ensued…

But allow me to tell you what I thought of their Honey Hefe, as I feel I am in the unique position to speak about it before most other people will get a chance. Combining local honey from the Empress Hotel’s own beehives with a German-style hefewiezen, Hoyne has produced yet another winner which also happens to be a very refreshing take on the summer wheat.

Appearance: Light straw gold, translucent and very cloudy
Nose: light clove scent complimented by slight notes of honey and blossoms
Taste:
light wheat malts, slight taste of cloves, mild honey sweetness
Aftertaste: mild clove bitterness and malts giving way to a very clean finish
Overall: 8.5/10 (perfect for hot summer weather!)

Yeah, somehow these guys just keep making great beer. Perhaps that’s why they’ve become my favorite brewery, at least locally (musn’t let the Ontario beers of my youth feel left out!). My wife and I have agreed that they shall be our near-exclusive supplier of beer this summer since the growler sales are such a deal! I recommend people drop by, sale hours are posted on their website: http://hoynebrewing.ca/

Winners announced for the Canadian Brewing Awards 2012

Just the other night, the winners of the 2012 Canadian Brewing Awards were announced. It all took place in a gala ceremony in Montreal, the final event in a two day conference that also overlapped with part of the 19th annual Mondial de la Bière. As usual, the list is long and varied, but I’ve managed to procure the list with its many winners and honorees. Here they are, ordered by category and place. See if you can’t spot some of your favorites!


North American Style Lager

Gold: Brewhouse Pilsener, Great Western Brewing Co. (SK)
Silver: Sleeman Original Draught, Sleeman Breweries Ltd.
Bronze: Alpine Lager, Moosehead Breweries (NB)

North American Style Premium Lager
Gold: Vancouver Islander Lager, Vancouver Island Brewery (BC)
Silver: Muskoka Craft Lager, Muskoka Brewery (ON)
Bronze: Beach Blonde Lager, Tree Brewing Co. (BC)

European Style Lager (Pilsner)
Gold:  Steam Whistle Pilsner, Steam Whistle Brewing (ON)
Silver: Red Canoe Lager, Canoe Brewpub (BC)
Bronze: Steamworks Pilsner, Steamworks Brewing Co. (BC)

North American Style Amber Lager
Gold: Buzz Beer, Cool Beer Brewing Co. (ON)
Silver: Blue Buck Pale Ale, Phillips Brewing Co. (BC)
Bronze: Barking Squirrel Lager, Hop City Brewing Co. (ON)

North American Style Dark Lager
Gold: Hermann’s Dark Lager, Vancouver Island Brewing Co. (BC)
Silver: Okanagan Spring Brewmaster’s Black Lager, Sleeman Breweries
Bronze: King Dark Lager, King Brewery (ON)

Light (Calorie-Reduced) Lager  
Gold: Cracked Canoe Premium Light Lager, Moosehead Breweries (NB)
Silver: Moose Light, Moosehead Breweries (NB)
Bronze: Brewhouse Light, Great Western Brewing Co. (SK)

Bock – Traditional German Style
Gold: Deviator Doppelbock, Cameron’s Brewing Co. (ON)
Silver: Hermannator Ice Bock, Vancouver Island Brewing Co. (BC)
Bronze: Amsterdam Spring Bock, Amsterdam Brewing Co. (ON)

Kellerbier
Gold: Kellerbier, Creemore Springs Brewery (ON)
Silver: Bohemian Lager, R&B Brewing Co. (BC)
Bronze: Festivale, Beau’s All Natural Brewing Co. (ON)

Porter
Gold: Coffee Porter, R&B Brewing Co. (BC)
Silver: 25th Anniversary Robust Porter, Great Lakes Brewing Co. (ON)
Bronze: Coffee Stout, Phillips Brewing Co. (BC)

Strong Porter (Baltic)
Gold: Lost River Baltic Porter, Bellwoods Brewery (ON)
Silver: Grand Baltic Porter, Garrison Brewing Co. (NS)
Bronze: Okanagan Spring Porter, Sleeman Breweries

Cream Ale
Gold: Original 16, Great Western Brewing Co. (SK)
Silver: Portage Ale Cream Ale, Mill Street Brewery (ON)
Bronze: Begbie Cream Ale, Mt. Begbie Brewery (BC)

Kolsch
Gold: Lug Tread, Beau’s All Natural Brewing Co. (ON)
Silver: Swans Arctic Ale, Swans Brewery (BC)
Bronze: Harvest Moon Organic Hemp Ale, Nelson Brewing Co. (BC)

North American Style Amber/Red Ale
Gold:  Red Racer ESB, Central City Brewing Co. (BC)
Silver: Thirsty Beaver Amber Ale, Tree Brewing Co. (BC)
Bronze: Lighthouse Race Rocks Ale, Lighthouse Brewing Co. (BC)

North American Style Blonde/Golden Ale
Gold: Boreale Blonde, Les Brasseurs du Nord (QC)
Silver: Picaroons Blonde, Picaroons Traditional Ales (NB)
Bronze: Kichesippi Natural Blonde, Kichesippi Beer Co. (ON)

Brown Ale
Gold: Iron Horse Brown Ale, Prince Edward Island Brewing Co. (PEI)
Silver: Beaver Brown Ale, Canoe Brewpub (BC)
Bronze: Nelson After Dark, Nelson Brewing Co. (BC)

American Style Black Ale
Gold: Terrestrial India Brown Ale, Wellington County Brewery (ON)
Silver: Black IPA, Brasserie Dunham (QC)
Bronze: Houblon Libre, Microbrasserie du Lac Saint-Jean (QC)

Scotch Ale
Gold: Swans Scotch Ale, Swans Brewery (BC)
Silver: Iron Duke, Wellington County Brewery (ON)
Bronze: St. Ambroise Scotch Ale, McAuslan Brewing Inc (QC)

English Style Pale Ale (Bitter)
Gold: Pale Ale, Yaletown Brewing Co. (BC)
Silver: St. Ambroise Pale Ale, McAuslan Brewing Inc (QC)
Bronze: River Rock Bitter, Canoe Brewpub (BC)

North American Style Pale Ale (Bitter)  
Gold: Steamworks Pale Ale, Steamworks Brewing Co. (BC)
Silver: Crazy Canuck Pale Ale, Great Lakes Brewing Co. (ON)
Bronze: Naughty Neighbour, Nickel Brook, (ON)

Wheat Beer – Belgian Style White/Wit
Gold: Cheval Blanc, Les Brasseurs RJ (QC)
Silver: Dominus Vobiscum Blanche, Microbrasserie Charlevoix (QC)
Bronze: Mons Abbey Witte, Brasserie Belgh Brasse (QC)

Wheat Beer – German Style Hefeweizen
Gold: N/A (no beer had high enough points to receive gold)
Silver: Beachcomber Summer Ale, Vancouver Island Brewing (BC)
Bronze: Hefeweizen Unfiltered Wheat Ale, Tree Brewing Co. (BC)

Wheat Beer – North American Style
Gold: Sungod Wheat Ale, R&B Brewing Co. (BC)
Silver: Sir John A’s Honey Wheat, Prince Edward Island Brewing Co. (PEI)
Bronze: Dooryard Summer Ale,  Picaroons Traditional Ales (NB)

Belgian Style Abbey Ale
Gold: Don Juan, Broadway Microbrasserie and Pub (QC)
Silver: Tchucke, Broadway Microbrasserie and Pub (QC)
Bronze: Dominus Vobiscum Double, Microbrasserie Charlevoix (QC)

Belgian Style Strong Specialty Ale
Gold: Tripe a Trois, A la Fut (QC)
Silver: Buteuse, Microbrasserie Le Trou du Diable (QC)
Bronze: 17 Grande Reserve, Unibroue (QC)

Barley Wine Style Ale
Gold: Woolly Bugger Barleywine, Howe Sound Brewing Co. (BC)
Silver: Thor’s Hammer Barleywine, Central City Brewing Co. (BC)
Bronze: Gaz de Course, Brouhaha (QC)

Stout
Gold: St. Ambroise Oatmeal Stout, McAuslan Brewing Inc. (QC)
Silver: Bete Noire, A La Fut (QC)
Bronze: Midnight Sun Espresso Stout, Yukon Brewing Co. (YT)

Imperial Stout
Gold: Stout Imperiale Russe, Brasserie Dunham (QC)
Silver: Fort Garry Kona Imperial Stout, Fort Garry Brewing Co. (MB)
Bronze: Hammer Imperial Stout, Phillips Brewing Co. (BC)

English Style India Pale Ale
Gold: Powell IPA, Coal Harbour Brewing Co. (BC)
Silver: Tranquility IPA, Moon Under Water Pub and Brewery (BC)
Bronze: Devil’s Elbow IPA, Howe Sound Brewing Co. (BC)

American Style India Pale Ale
Gold: Karma Citra, Great Lakes Brewing Co. (ON)
Silver: Rye Pale Ale, Cameron’s Brewing Co. (ON)
Bronze: Swans Extra IPA, Swans Brewery (BC)

Imperial India Pale Ale
Gold: Central City Imperial IPA, Central City Brewing Co. (BC)
Silver: Diable au Corps, Les Brasseurs du Temps (QC)
Bronze: Amnesiac Double IPA, Phillips Brewing Co. (BC)

French and Belgian Style Saison
Gold: Deliverance Saison, Great Lakes Brewing Co. (ON)
Silver: Nit Wit, Garrison Brewing Co. (NS)
Bronze: Patio Saison, Beau’s All Natural Brewing Co. (ON)

Special Honey/Maple Lager or Ale
Gold: Royal York Stinger, Mill Street Brewery (ON)
Silver: Boreale Doree, Les Brasseurs du Nord (QC)
Bronze:  Cypress Honey Lager, Granville Island Brewing Co. (BC)

Fruit Beer
Gold: Mandarin Orange Amber Ale, Dead Frog Brewery (BC)
Silver: Pepper Lime Lager, Dead Frog Brewery (BC)
Bronze: Moose Light Lime, Moosehead Breweries (NB)

Fruit Wheat Beer
Gold: Amsterdam Framboise, Amsterdam Brewing Co. (ON)
Silver: Ephemere Pomme, Unibroue (QC)
Bronze: Crique, A La Fut (QC)

Pumpkin Beer
Gold: St. Ambroise Pumpkin Ale, McAuslan Brewing Inc. (QC)
Silver: Highballer Pumpkin Ale, Grand River Brewing Co. (ON)
Bronze: Pumpkineater, Howe Sound Brewing Co. (BC)

Wood and Barrel Aged Beer
Gold: 25th Anniversary Bourbon Barrel Aged Robust Porter, Great Lakes Brewing Co. (ON
Silver: Amsterdam Leipziger Gose, Amsterdam Brewing Co. (ON)
Bronze: Red Truck Ruby, Red Truck Beer Co. (BC)

Wood and Barrel Aged Strong Beer
Gold: Thor’s Hammer Bourbon Barrel Barley Wine, Central City Brewing Co. (BC)
Silver: Nectar of the Gods, Russell Brewing Co. (BC)
Bronze: Singularity Russian Imperial Stout, Driftwood Brewery (BC)

Wood and Barrel Aged Sour Beer
Gold: Co-Hop V,  A La Fut (QC)
Silver: Bird of Prey-Flanders Red, Driftwood Brewing Co. (BC)
Bronze: Vent d’Anges,  Broadway Microbrasserie and Pub (QC)

Experimental Beer
Gold: Dark Snout Bacon Stout, R&B Brewing Co. (BC)
Silver: Honey Lavender, Garrison Brewing Co. (NS)
Bronze: Harry Porter and the Bourbon Soaked Vanilla Beans, Great Lakes Brewing Co. (ON)

Beer of the Year – Co-Hop V, A La Fut (QC)
Brewery of the Year – Central City Brewing Co.