Off To The Beer Seminar!

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Today is a great day for beer appreciation, because it is the day that I finally get to host my long-overdue beer-tasting and history of beer seminar. Ten participants have signed on, the space has been reserved, and in a few hours time, I will be giving the attendees a quick (well not too quick) run-down on the history of the brewing craft, coupled with some generous sampling.

I’ve prepared the following list based on what I could find and what seemed indispensable to me as far as representing the history and full range of brewing was concerned. All told, they are divided by style more than historical period, but I will be presenting them in this order since it gives a pretty good idea of how the art evolved over time.

Ancient Beers:
Heather: Salt Spring Island Heather Ale (5% / 650 ml)
(I desperately wanted to find a bomber of Gruit as well, but that variety of beer is both hard to find and hopelessly out of season right now)

Abbey Beers:
Blonde: Affligem Blonde (6.8% / 330ml)
Tripel: Townsite Charleston Tripel (9% / 650 ml)
Sour: Driftwood Belle Royale (8% / 650 ml)

Anglo-American Beer:
Pale Ale: Hoyne’s Down Easy (5.2% / 650ml)
India Pale Ale: Driftwood Fat Tug IPA (7% / 650 ml)
Stout: Hopworks 7-Grain Stout (5.3% / 650 ml)
Barley Wine: Howe Sound Wooly Bugger (10.5% / 375 ml)

German Beer:
Lager: Ayinger Dortmunder Lager (5.5% / 500 ml)
Oktoberfest: Russel Marzen (5.5% / 650ml)
Hefeweizen: Schneider Weisse (5.4% / 500 ml)
Bock: Schneider Weisse Aventinus (8% / 500ml)
Smokebeer: Aecht Schlenkerla Rauchbier (6.6% / 500 ml)

The seminar will begin with where and how beer became a cornerstone of civilization – emerging alongside agriculture and sedentary communities some 8000 years ago in the Fertile Crescent. I will then go on to how the rise of wine making introduced a sense of cultural distinction during Classical Antiquity, and the influence was largely confined to the parts of Europe where the Roman Empire had influence (France, Spain, Italy, the Mediterranean, but not Germany, the Low Countries, Eastern Europe, or the British Isles).

Then comes the Middle Ages, the establishment of Abbey/Monastery Brewing, the rise of hop use, the advent of Lager and the growing professionalization of the industry. Which then gives way to the industrial revolution and the emergence of brewing as a big business, followed of course by the modern era and the resurgence in craft brewing. It promises to be interesting, I just hope I can keep it down to 20 minutes. Leaves more time from sampling!

I’ll be sure to let you all know how it goes and I hope to repeat it in the very near future with some other (and larger) groups of people.

Trappistes Rochefort 10

https://i0.wp.com/www.theperfectlyhappyman.com/uploads/trappistes-rochefort-10.jpgHello again and welcome back to this celebration of Winter Beer and Trappist Ales! As we are coming up on the holidays, let me also wish everyone a very merry Christmas, Happy New Year, and any other holidays you choose to observe. May they be joyous, full of good food and drink, and may you be surrounded by loved ones for the duration!

Picking up where I left off the other day, I have yet another beer from the Trappistes Rochefort brewery. After sampling their 6 and more recently, their 8, I finally got a chance to resample their 10 and learn once again why I enjoy their lineup so much. Whereas the previous beers were a double and triple respectively, the lineup concludes with their “blue cap” quadruple ale; an extra-dark, extra strong (11.3% alc/vol), extra sugary beer with thick malts, a chewy mouth feel, and plenty of sugar, spice and fruit to go around.

Appearance: Dark brown, translucent, good foam retention
Nose: Rich malt nose, notes of dates, brown sugar and yeast
Taste: Sweet, heavy malts, viscous mouth feel, plums, raisins, dates
Aftertaste: Slight spice, sugars, slightly bitter finish
Overall: 9/10

Of the three, I have determined that the 8 is my favorite overall, mainly because it offers the best balance of fruit, spice and sugar. But that need not and will not apply to all people and palates. Sample the entire line and decide for yourself which possesses the most preferable characteristics. However, I must advise caution when drinking at this end of the Rochefort color spectrum. These beers are rich, sweet and very sugary, but that belies an intense strength which can knock you sideways. When compared to the red and green-colored caps, this last one can cause serious “Blue Shift”! Pour yourself one, preferably in a specialized Trappist glass, and savor. Savor!

Orval Trappist

https://i0.wp.com/www.orval.be/website/images/dbfiles/3662/large/0910088/Orval-Authentic--know-how.jpgContinuing in the great tradition of winter ales and Trappist beers, we now proceed to another great and venerable Belgian vintage. Much like its peers, this beer is a certified Trappist product, crafted by monks, that is in keeping with the centuries-long tradition of Monastery brewing!

Founded in 1931 as a way to finance the massive reconstruction project for the town of Orval. In keeping with monastic principles, all profits generated by the sale of the beer go to social welfare works and the maintenance of the monastic buildings. So when you drink this beer, your partaking in charitable works as well as enjoying an authentic beer!

But alas, the beer itself is the subject of my concern here. After learning of its existence over a decade ago in the fine cellars of Vineyards Bistro, Ottawa, it fast became one of my favorites. Originally, I enjoyed it as a dessert beer given its compatibility with sweet and fruity foods, but have since come to appreciate it for its food-pairing and all-around appeal.

Appearance: Orange, cloudy, good foam retention
Nose: Yeast, notes of sour cherry and oak
Taste: Light malt, giving way to robust oak and sour cherry
Aftertaste: Slight bitterness, tart fruit, red wine-like finish
Overall: 9/10

As I said, the hints of cherry and oak make it well suited to desert fare, much like a nice dry red wine. However, it is also well at home when it comes to pastas, pizzas, or mussels and frites, the good Belgian fare you can expect to find in a Euro-pub! And now that I have a line on where to get some (thank you again Cook St. Liquor), I plan to enjoy it often and test its versatility.