Corsendonk Agnus Tripel Ale

Corsendonk-Agnus_tripel-33-1_1024x1024Brewer: Brouwerij Corsendonk, Turnhout, Belgium
Style: Tripel
ABV: 7.5%
IBUs: Unlisted

Description: Corsendonk Agnus is the brewery’s take on the traditional Belgian Tripel. True to this tradition, it combines a generous dose of pale malt with a mild hopping, and is then bottle-fermented using active yeast cultures. And the end result is a brew that is rich, malty, crisp and bubbly, and none too shy about its alcohol content.

Tasting Notes: Corsendonk is kind of a big deal as far as the Belgian beer game goes. In the past, I’ve had their Pater a few times, so I was pretty pleased to see their Tripel available locally. And I was quite impressed with it. In addition to all the things I’ve come to love about Tripels – rich malt, strength, lots of yeasty flavor – the Corsendonk Agnus manages to pull all of that with a degree of subtlety. Its drinkable and refreshing on top of it all, which is a nice plus.

Appearance: Golden-orange, cloudy, good foam retention and carbonation
Nose: Rich malt, sugars, citrus, floral nose, coriander spice, yeast
Taste: Rich, crisp malt, hint of sugar, honey, coriander spice, yeasty effervescence
Aftertaste: Lingering notes of honey, yeasty bitterness
Overall: 9/10

Off To The Beer Seminar!

photo 1

 

Today is a great day for beer appreciation, because it is the day that I finally get to host my long-overdue beer-tasting and history of beer seminar. Ten participants have signed on, the space has been reserved, and in a few hours time, I will be giving the attendees a quick (well not too quick) run-down on the history of the brewing craft, coupled with some generous sampling.

I’ve prepared the following list based on what I could find and what seemed indispensable to me as far as representing the history and full range of brewing was concerned. All told, they are divided by style more than historical period, but I will be presenting them in this order since it gives a pretty good idea of how the art evolved over time.

Ancient Beers:
Heather: Salt Spring Island Heather Ale (5% / 650 ml)
(I desperately wanted to find a bomber of Gruit as well, but that variety of beer is both hard to find and hopelessly out of season right now)

Abbey Beers:
Blonde: Affligem Blonde (6.8% / 330ml)
Tripel: Townsite Charleston Tripel (9% / 650 ml)
Sour: Driftwood Belle Royale (8% / 650 ml)

Anglo-American Beer:
Pale Ale: Hoyne’s Down Easy (5.2% / 650ml)
India Pale Ale: Driftwood Fat Tug IPA (7% / 650 ml)
Stout: Hopworks 7-Grain Stout (5.3% / 650 ml)
Barley Wine: Howe Sound Wooly Bugger (10.5% / 375 ml)

German Beer:
Lager: Ayinger Dortmunder Lager (5.5% / 500 ml)
Oktoberfest: Russel Marzen (5.5% / 650ml)
Hefeweizen: Schneider Weisse (5.4% / 500 ml)
Bock: Schneider Weisse Aventinus (8% / 500ml)
Smokebeer: Aecht Schlenkerla Rauchbier (6.6% / 500 ml)

The seminar will begin with where and how beer became a cornerstone of civilization – emerging alongside agriculture and sedentary communities some 8000 years ago in the Fertile Crescent. I will then go on to how the rise of wine making introduced a sense of cultural distinction during Classical Antiquity, and the influence was largely confined to the parts of Europe where the Roman Empire had influence (France, Spain, Italy, the Mediterranean, but not Germany, the Low Countries, Eastern Europe, or the British Isles).

Then comes the Middle Ages, the establishment of Abbey/Monastery Brewing, the rise of hop use, the advent of Lager and the growing professionalization of the industry. Which then gives way to the industrial revolution and the emergence of brewing as a big business, followed of course by the modern era and the resurgence in craft brewing. It promises to be interesting, I just hope I can keep it down to 20 minutes. Leaves more time from sampling!

I’ll be sure to let you all know how it goes and I hope to repeat it in the very near future with some other (and larger) groups of people.