Hoyne’s Brewing (part II)

And we’re back with more Hoyne! Today, I will be reviewing the second half of their starting lineup, featuring all the flavors I wasn’t able to get my hands on before. But first, I should mention that after my last review, I heard from the brewers themselves!

Well… actually I wrote to them and told them I was impressed with their wares. But to my surprise, they wrote back and even invited me and my darling bride to come by their base of operations and try some samplers. Oh, and they also let me know that they are open for growler sales on Thurs and Fri from 3 – 6 pm and Sat from noon – 6, information I now pass onto you, the consumer!  Do what you like with that, but I for one plan to go! My car has a surprising capacity, and I bet I could fit several growlers in the back…

But I digress. Here’s Hoyne’s Pale Ale and their Pilsner, both of which were consistent with their Bock and IPA (i.e. kick-ass!)

Down Easy Pale Ale: The name pretty much says it all. Pale Ale has a reputation for being hoppy, yet crisp and drinkable, at least when it’s the good kind. And I can honestly say, without doubt or exaggeration, that this beer is true to that legacy. When my wife and I tilted some in our favorite Hofbrauhaus mugs, our first words to each other were “oooooh”. Crisp, clean, drinkable, yet still with a good hop bite and a strong aroma, this beer is an easy-drinker, but still maintains all that is right about a pale ale. Another big hit! 5/5

Hoyner Pilsner: Last but certainly not least. This beer impressed the heck out of me, mainly because it accomplished all that a pilsner usually does, but still found room to go above and beyond. Allow me to explain. Pilsner’s are typically crisp and clean tasting, but have a rather distinct and lingering taste that some would qualify as skunky. However, this beer manages to pull all that off – being crisp, clean and hoppy – but without any skunky aftertaste. In fact, the flavor is quite subtle, combining a light hop bite with a gentle, lingering aftertaste. Which makes for an especially refreshing drink. I’m looking forward to this summer when my wife and I can finally open our patio and invite some friends over! 5/5

Okay, that’s Hoyne’s starting lineup covered. I’m looking forward to any additional beers and seasonals they might choose to release in the near future. Given their performance so far, I imagine they will be appropriately kick-ass. So… hintedy hint hint Hoyne 😉

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Hoyne’s Brewing

You ever have this happen to you, where multiple sources tell you you have to try something? Well, that happened to me recently. Everywhere I turned, it seemed people were talking about Hoyne’s brewery, a start-up operation located right here in the heart of Victoria, BC. But of course, I did a little homework before sampling from this beer maker, and was pretty damn impressed with what I found!

For starters, the brew master of Hoyne apparently got his start with Swann’s own brewpub, an operation he started with Frank Appleton back in 1989, which he then took over when the venerable Appleton moved on. He then started the Canoe Club 1998, which he then ran for 13 years before moving on himself to establish Hoyne. As far as I’m concerned, they don’t make credentials better than that!

Okay, enough fawning. Here’s what I’ve sampled thus far, and it just happens to be half of their starting lineup:

Hoyne’s Big Bock: First impressions… great! In fact, I was reminded of Creemore Urbock, one of my all-time favorites. Smooth, malty, lightly hopped, and with a tawny taste that has nice subtle notes that just linger on the tongue. Faint notes of chocolate also give this beer a light trace of sweetness, which is absolutely essential when it comes to good bock! Congratulations, Hoyne! My first sampling and you smacked it out of the park! 5/5

Next up, always a personal favorite, their IPA!

Devil’s Dream IPA: I tasted this one just a few minutes ago, and immediately another comparison came to mind, to another one of my favorites no less! Strong, malty, but with a big hop kick that is strongly citrusy in terms of bouquet and taste, I was immediately reminded of Driftwood’s Fat Tug. This is no coincidence, as both are perfect examples of a true Northwest IPA, using hops and malts that are characteristic of this fine region. Another home run! 5/5

Now I just need to try their Down Easy Pale Ale and Hoyner Pilsner, and given the impression they’ve already made, I expect good things! My apologies to Hoyne for the comparative analysis, but the association was unavoidable. Rest assured that if I had tried yours first, I would be comparing their beers to you! Keep up the good work!